Code redWhy China’s AI push is worrying

  • For sheer volume of research on AI, if not quality, Chinese academics surpass their American peers; AI-related patent submissions in China almost tripled between 2010 and 2014 compared with the previous five years.
  • No other country could generate such a volume of data to enable machines to learn patterns indicative of rare diseases, for example.
  • A cyber-security law that came into force in June requires foreign firms to store data they collect on Chinese customers within the country’s borders; outsiders cannot use Chinese data to offer services to third parties.
  • If it happens at all, the equivalent Chinese discussion about the limits of ethical AI research is far more opaque.
  • AI techniques are perfect for finding patterns in the massive amounts of data that Chinese censors must handle in order to maintain a grip on the citizenry.

IMAGINE the perfect environment for developing artificial intelligence (AI). The ingredients would include masses of processing power, lots of computer-science boffins, a torrent of capital—and abundant data with which to train machines to recognise and respond to patterns.

@TheEconomist: China wants to be the world’s leading AI power by 2030

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Code redWhy China’s AI push is worrying