Wearables and artificial intelligence define future

#Wearables and #AI define future

#Health #IoT #bigdata
#Insurtech #fintech

  • This content is produced by The Australian Financial Review in commercial partnership with the Commonwealth Bank The Internet of Medical Things presents a range of new opportunities for medical businesses and entrepreneurs, claims Mark Dougan, Frost and Sullivan’s Consulting Director for Asia-Pacific.
  • This was one of the business opportunities in the future Internet of Medical Things market – estimated to be worth $20 billion by the beginning of next decade – laid out by Mr Dougan for businesses in the healthcare sector at the recent Australian Healthcare Week conference in Sydney.
  • In the very near future, wearable devices will be able to track every aspect of health and fitness and – when combined with artificial intelligence, robotics and the Internet of Medical Things – there are many opportunities for businesses and practitioners throughout the medical industry.
  • Mr Dougan did warn that there are risks for businesses in the Internet of Medical Things, and cited six common points of failure — ranging from products beings too complex and not interoperable, through to misdirected business models.
  • “How does your device or solution integrate primary and home-based care; who do you need to partner with; how effectively can you reach the end patient; what’s your business model; and finally, how can you as an organisation transform and disrupt how healthcare is delivered.”

The Internet of Medical Things presents a range of new opportunities for medical businesses and entrepreneurs.
Continue reading “Wearables and artificial intelligence define future”

Wearables and artificial intelligence define future

#Wearables and #AI define future

#Health #IoT #bigdata
#Insurtech #fintech

  • This content is produced by The Australian Financial Review in commercial partnership with the Commonwealth Bank The Internet of Medical Things presents a range of new opportunities for medical businesses and entrepreneurs, claims Mark Dougan, Frost and Sullivan’s Consulting Director for Asia-Pacific.
  • This was one of the business opportunities in the future Internet of Medical Things market – estimated to be worth $20 billion by the beginning of next decade – laid out by Mr Dougan for businesses in the healthcare sector at the recent Australian Healthcare Week conference in Sydney.
  • In the very near future, wearable devices will be able to track every aspect of health and fitness and – when combined with artificial intelligence, robotics and the Internet of Medical Things – there are many opportunities for businesses and practitioners throughout the medical industry.
  • Mr Dougan did warn that there are risks for businesses in the Internet of Medical Things, and cited six common points of failure — ranging from products beings too complex and not interoperable, through to misdirected business models.
  • “How does your device or solution integrate primary and home-based care; who do you need to partner with; how effectively can you reach the end patient; what’s your business model; and finally, how can you as an organisation transform and disrupt how healthcare is delivered.”

The Internet of Medical Things presents a range of new opportunities for medical businesses and entrepreneurs.
Continue reading “Wearables and artificial intelligence define future”

Is Artificial Intelligence the Next Dot-Com Bubble?

Is #ArtificialIntelligence the Next Dot-Com Bubble? 

 #fintech #VC #AI @nanalyzetweets

  • We’ll stick to playing rock-paper-scissors with AI, but all of this is leading to some serious visibility for AI as an emerging technology – which as investors make us want to get some skin in the game.
  • The recent news that artificial intelligence (AI) startup Afiniti may have confidentially filed for IPO was the first time that we started to feel like this thing might be revving up for real now.
  • It wasn’t just because this would be the first pure-play AI startup to see an IPO, it was because we really couldn’t believe how effective Afiniti’s technology was in adding value.
  • Secondly we’re also seeing a very large number of AI startups getting into the game (over 1,500) which is the same sort of pile-on mentality we saw in the dot-com era.
  • Now you just add a tagline to that same website that says “powered by AI” and now you’re an “AI company”.

If you’ve played Texas Hold’em, then you know how tough it is to be a good poker player. Lots of venture capitalists like to play poker, so it wasn’t surprising to see one who thought to himself “let’s see how good artificial intelligence (AI) really is“. He consulted a team of engineers and computer scientists to see where they might be able to exploit the AI agent named Lengpudashi. They then played 36,000 hands over 5 days and the AI agent kicked the isht out of them. We’ll stick to playing rock-paper-scissors with AI, but all of this is leading to some serious visibility for AI as an emerging technology – which as investors make us want to get some skin in the game. The problem is, there aren’t many ways to do that yet.
Continue reading “Is Artificial Intelligence the Next Dot-Com Bubble?”