Framework: The role of Humans in the Future of Work

Framework: The role of Humans in the Future of Work | #Analytics #Artificialintelligence #RT

  • For the last years in addressing the future of work I have often focused on the human capabilities that will drive value as machines become more capable and the work landscape is transformed.
  • To help define and clarify these capabilities I created a landscape on the role of Humans in the Future of Work, which I first shared publicly in my keynote yesterday.
  • This framework overlaps and builds on my Future of Work Framework, specifically building out the distinctive human capabilities that will be relevant and valued as the work landscape is transformed.
  • I have spoken and written before about the three fundamental human capabilities for the future of work: EXPERTISE, RELATIONSHIPS and CREATIVITY.
  • Recognizing these distinctive human capabilities allows us to design work, organizations and education to use and develop these capabilities to best effect.

For the last years in addressing the future of work I have often focused on the human capabilities that will drive value as machines become more capable and the work landscape is transformed.
Continue reading “Framework: The role of Humans in the Future of Work”

The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI

The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI  #AI

  • ‘Last year, a strange self-driving car was released onto the quiet roads of Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  • The experimental vehicle, developed by researchers at the chip maker Nvidia, didn’t look different from other autonomous cars, but it was unlike anything demonstrated by Google, Tesla, or General Motors, and it showed the rising power of artificial intelligence.
  • The car didn’t follow a single instruction provided by an engineer or programmer.
  • Getting a car to drive this way was an impressive feat.
  • But it’s also a bit unsettling, since it isn’t completely clear how the car makes its decisions.

‘Last year, a strange self-driving car was released onto the quiet roads of Monmouth County, New Jersey. The experimental vehicle, developed by researchers at the chip maker Nvidia, didn’t look different from other autonomous cars, but it was unlike anything demonstrated by Google, Tesla, or General Motors, and it showed the rising power of artificial intelligence. The car didn’t follow a single instruction provided by an engineer or programmer. Instead, it relied entirely on an algorithm that had taught itself to drive by watching a human do it.
Continue reading “The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI”