Practical Deep Learning For Coders—18 hours of lessons for free

Practical #DeepLearning For Coders—18 hours of lessons for free

  • After this course, I cannot ignore the new developments in deep learning—I will devote one third of my machine learning course to the subject.
  • I’m a CEO, not a coder, so the idea that I’d be able to create a GPU deep learning server in the cloud meant learning a lot of new things—but with all the help on the wiki and from the instructors and community on the forum I did it!
  • Sometimes I feared whether I would be able to solve any deep learning problems, as all the research papers I read were very mathy beyond reach of simple intuitive terms.
  • But Jeremy and Rachel (Course Professors) believe in the theory of ‘Simple is Powerful’, by virtue of which anyone who takes this course will be able to confidently understand the simple techniques behind the ‘magic’ Deep Learning.
  • The course exceeded my expectations and showed me first hand how both Deep Learning and ourselves could change the world for better.

fast.ai’s practical deep learning MOOC for coders. Learn CNNs, RNNs, computer vision, NLP, recommendation systems, keras, theano, and much more! neural networks!

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The Coming Battle Between Apps and Chatbots

The chatbot may make apps as we know them obsolete in the next several years. #AI #Tech

  • The idea of using a gatekeeper is not a new one.
  • The chatbot may be giving apps a run for their money.
  • The algorithms in each chatbot would act much in the same way that preinstalled apps do, and would likely have default programmed selections.
  • Chatbots are the future of conversation-based interfaces , and application use is likely to fall behind if apps don’t transform.
  • Individuals and businesses alike stand to benefit from chatbots.

Chatbots are on track to replace search engines, personal assistants, and apps. Apps as we know them may become obsolete in just a few years.
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Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the US economy?

Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the #US economy?  #robots

  • Advances in artificial intelligence definitely change the kind of skills that labor needs to supplement the next generation of robots.
  • The answer lies, to an extent, on how technological growth affects demand for labor in the United States and around the world.
  • The article is published in collaboration with the Washington Center for Equitable Growth .
  • Past experience with technological change, Furman argues, shows that new technologies don’t reduce demand for all labor, but rather shift the composition of demand for workers.
  • If robots can essentially replace a large chunk of labor, then businesses will stop hiring workers and instead replace them with robots.

Read the full article, click here.


@wef: “Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the #US economy? #robots”


Jason Furman, chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers gave a speech last week on the “opportunities and challenges” presented by artificial intelligence. The potential challenges of artificial intelligence are, to put it in the terms of some recent economic policy conversations, problems posed by the “rise of the robots.” The question at the heart of the debate is how concerned should we humans be about the impact of future technological change on our economy and society? Will we all be thrown out of work? Will new technologies make production so easy that economic growth absolutely booms? Or, perhaps more realistically, will something in between happen?


Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the US economy?

Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the US economy?

Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the #US economy?  #robots

  • Advances in artificial intelligence definitely change the kind of skills that labor needs to supplement the next generation of robots.
  • If robots can essentially replace a large chunk of labor, then businesses will stop hiring workers and instead replace them with robots.
  • The article is published in collaboration with the Washington Center for Equitable Growth .
  • Past experience with technological change, Furman argues, shows that new technologies don’t reduce demand for all labor, but rather shift the composition of demand for workers.
  • The answer lies, to an extent, on how technological growth affects demand for labor in the United States and around the world.

Read the full article, click here.


@wef: “Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the #US economy? #robots”


Jason Furman, chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers gave a speech last week on the “opportunities and challenges” presented by artificial intelligence. The potential challenges of artificial intelligence are, to put it in the terms of some recent economic policy conversations, problems posed by the “rise of the robots.” The question at the heart of the debate is how concerned should we humans be about the impact of future technological change on our economy and society? Will we all be thrown out of work? Will new technologies make production so easy that economic growth absolutely booms? Or, perhaps more realistically, will something in between happen?


Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the US economy?

Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the US economy?

Artificial intelligence global quarterly financing history #AI

  • Advances in artificial intelligence definitely change the kind of skills that labor needs to supplement the next generation of robots.
  • If robots can essentially replace a large chunk of labor, then businesses will stop hiring workers and instead replace them with robots.
  • The article is published in collaboration with the Washington Center for Equitable Growth .
  • The answer lies, to an extent, on how technological growth affects demand for labor in the United States and around the world.
  • Past experience with technological change, Furman argues, shows that new technologies don’t reduce demand for all labor, but rather shift the composition of demand for workers.

Read the full article, click here.


@ValaAfshar: “Artificial intelligence global quarterly financing history #AI”


Jason Furman, chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers gave a speech last week on the “opportunities and challenges” presented by artificial intelligence. The potential challenges of artificial intelligence are, to put it in the terms of some recent economic policy conversations, problems posed by the “rise of the robots.” The question at the heart of the debate is how concerned should we humans be about the impact of future technological change on our economy and society? Will we all be thrown out of work? Will new technologies make production so easy that economic growth absolutely booms? Or, perhaps more realistically, will something in between happen?


Artificial intelligence: opportunity or challenge for the US economy?