Dubai is introducing robotic policemen, to make up 25% of the force by 2030

Robotic policemen will make up 25% of Dubai's police force by 2030  #AI

  • On Wednesday, May 24, Dubai will launch a new police robot that marks the first phase of the integration of robots into the police force.
  • This modified version of the REEM robot (Designed by PAL robotics and unveiled in 2011) is capable of feeding video to a command center, forwarding reported crimes to police, settling fines, facial recognition, and speaking nine languages.
  • Dubai hopes robots will constitute 25 percent of its police force by 2030, with the next stage being to use them as receptionists in police stations.
  • Brigadier Khalid Nasser Alrazooqi, General Director of Dubai Police’s Smart Services Department, told CNN that they eventually want to release a “fully-functional robot that can work as [a] normal police officer.”
  • In February, China started using the AnBot that uses facial recognition to identify criminals and is capable of following them until the police arrive.

On Wednesday, May 24, Dubai will launch a new police robot that marks the first phase of the integration of robots into the police force. This modified version of the REEM robot (Designed by PAL robotics and unveiled in 2011) is capable of feeding video to a command center, forwarding reported crimes to police, settling fines, facial recognition, and speaking nine languages. It will operate at most malls and tourist attractions.
Continue reading “Dubai is introducing robotic policemen, to make up 25% of the force by 2030”

Dubai is introducing robotic policemen, to make up 25% of the force by 2030

Dubai is introducing robotic policemen, to make up 25% of the force by 2030  #AI

  • On Wednesday, May 24, Dubai will launch a new police robot that marks the first phase of the integration of robots into the police force.
  • This modified version of the REEM robot (Designed by PAL robotics and unveiled in 2011) is capable of feeding video to a command center, forwarding reported crimes to police, settling fines, facial recognition, and speaking nine languages.
  • Dubai hopes robots will constitute 25 percent of its police force by 2030, with the next stage being to use them as receptionists in police stations.
  • Brigadier Khalid Nasser Alrazooqi, General Director of Dubai Police’s Smart Services Department, told CNN that they eventually want to release a “fully-functional robot that can work as [a] normal police officer.”
  • In February, China started using the AnBot that uses facial recognition to identify criminals and is capable of following them until the police arrive.

On Wednesday, May 24, Dubai will launch a new police robot that marks the first phase of the integration of robots into the police force. This modified version of the REEM robot (Designed by PAL robotics and unveiled in 2011) is capable of feeding video to a command center, forwarding reported crimes to police, settling fines, facial recognition, and speaking nine languages. It will operate at most malls and tourist attractions.
Continue reading “Dubai is introducing robotic policemen, to make up 25% of the force by 2030”

Facebook is using machine learning to prevent suicide

Facebook is using machine learning to prevent suicide  #technology

  • Social networks have made headlines for inadvertently providing a forum for those planning to take their own lives, with a number of people livestreaming their suicide attempts.
  • Image: Facebook

    Identifying high-risk cases

    Facebook has now taken the initiative to monitor its network actively for hints that someone may be contemplating to commit suicide.

  • “The AI is actually more accurate than the reports that we get from people that are flagged as suicide and self-injury,” Facebook Product Manager Vanessa Callison-Burch said in an interview with BuzzFeed News.
  • To tackle the live video streaming of suicide attempts, Facebook has also launched a new tool for friends to report videos that concern them.
  • Image: Facebook

    How other digital platforms react

    If you search ‘how to commit suicide’ on Google, the search engine flags up the Samaritan’s helpline, along with ads for a number of other support organisations.

Social networks have made headlines for inadvertently providing a forum for those planning to take their own lives, with a number of people livestreaming their suicide attempts.
Continue reading “Facebook is using machine learning to prevent suicide”

Facebook is using machine learning to prevent suicide

Facebook is using machine learning to prevent suicide  #technology

  • Social networks have made headlines for inadvertently providing a forum for those planning to take their own lives, with a number of people livestreaming their suicide attempts.
  • Image: Facebook

    Identifying high-risk cases

    Facebook has now taken the initiative to monitor its network actively for hints that someone may be contemplating to commit suicide.

  • “The AI is actually more accurate than the reports that we get from people that are flagged as suicide and self-injury,” Facebook Product Manager Vanessa Callison-Burch said in an interview with BuzzFeed News.
  • To tackle the live video streaming of suicide attempts, Facebook has also launched a new tool for friends to report videos that concern them.
  • Image: Facebook

    How other digital platforms react

    If you search ‘how to commit suicide’ on Google, the search engine flags up the Samaritan’s helpline, along with ads for a number of other support organisations.

Social networks have made headlines for inadvertently providing a forum for those planning to take their own lives, with a number of people livestreaming their suicide attempts.
Continue reading “Facebook is using machine learning to prevent suicide”

Google translate is now able to translate even more languages, thanks to AI

The #AI that works like a human brain for Google translate  #technology

  • Google is trying to make Google Translate more accurate by expanding the number of languages that are supported by its neural machine translation software.
  • The Californian search giant announced on Monday that Hindi, Russian, and Vietnamese will be powered by neural machine translation in the next couple of weeks.
  • Eight other languages are already using neural machine translation technology.
  • “Neural translation is a lot better than our previous technology, because we translate whole sentences at a time, instead of pieces of a sentence,” wrote Barak Turovsky, product lead on Google Translate, in the blog post.
  • Turovsky added that Google will be rolling out neural machine translation to other languages in the coming weeks.

Google is trying to make Google Translate more accurate by expanding the number of languages that are supported by its neural machine translation software.
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Sergey Brin: I didn’t see AI coming

@Google co-founder Sergey Brin: I didn’t see #AI coming  #wef17

  • Brin said that anyone starting out as a young leader or entrepreneur should focus more on having fun than making money.
  • Committed to improving the state of the world
  • The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.
  • Politics, the Fourth Industrial Revolution and how business can make the world more humane
  • Now that AI is to stay, its future and potential uses have become even more difficult to predict.

Sergey Brin, the co-founder of Google and one of the most successful Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, says he did not foresee the artificial intelligence revolution that has transformed the tech industry.
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Can you tell if this music was composed by artificial intelligence?

Can you tell if this music was composed by artificial intelligence?  #technology

  • Davos download: global economic warming
  • The results showed that more than half the listeners attributed DeepBach-generated harmonies to Bach, while music by Bach was correctly identified by 75 percent of the listeners. “
  • The article is published in collaboration with Futurism .
  • Music is mathematical, and composers like Bach often made music that followed a defined, step-like flow that is almost algorithmic.
  • The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach is known to have written many chorale cantatas, polyphonic hymns based on Lutheran texts. Each is fairly simple, featuring a single melody accompanied by three harmonies, so Gaetan Hadjeres and Francois Pachet from Sony Computer Science Laboratories in Paris thought it would be interesting to see if a machine could create chorale cantatas indistinguishable from Bach’s.
Continue reading “Can you tell if this music was composed by artificial intelligence?”