Behavioural Biometrics, IoT and AI

Behavioural Biometrics, #IoT and #AI #abdsc

  • Biometrics is defined as the science of establishing the identity of an individual based on physical, chemical or behavioural attributes of the person.
  • To discuss these issues, please join a new meetup group in London Behavioural Biometrics IoT and AI – – While Physical Biometric techniques (like fingerprint recognition, IRIS scans etc) are well established, Behavioural biometrics systems are still emerging.
  • According to the IBIA White paper, Behavioural biometrics provides a new generation of user security solutions that  identify individuals  based on the  unique way they interact with computer devices  like smartphones, tablets or mouse-screen-and-keyboard.
  • The authors also present a generalized algorithm for implementing behavioural biometric with the following steps: – – So, with this background, what is the relationship between Behavioural biometrics, IoT and AI?
  • To discuss these issues, please join a new meetup group in London  Behavioural Biometrics IoT and AI – – Ajit Jaokar conducts a course at Oxford University on Data Science for Internet of Things.

Background
Biometrics is defined as the science of establishing the identity of an individual based on physical, chemical or behavioural attributes of the per…
Continue reading “Behavioural Biometrics, IoT and AI”

This dystopian device warns you when AI is trying to impersonate actual humans

This Dystopian Device Warns You When #AI Is Trying to Impersonate Actual Humans

  • The wearable prototype device is designed to identify synthetic speech and alert the user that the voice they’re listening doesn’t belong to a flesh-and-blood individual.
  • As artificial intelligence (AI) and robotic technology rapidly evolve, we’re facing an uncertain future where machines can seemingly do all sorts of things better than people can – from mastering games to working our jobs, and even making new, more powerful forms of AI.
  • A team at Australian creative technology agency DT trained its AI up on a database of synthetic voices, teaching the offline network to recognise artificial speech patterns.
  • If the AI detects an actual human voice (code green), all is fine:

    But if the system picks up on synthetic speech, it has a unique way of subtly letting the human know that they’re talking to a digital clone.

  • “We wanted the device to give the wearer a unique sensation that matched what they were experiencing when a synthetic voice is detected,” the team explains on DT’s R&D blog.

Meet the Anti-AI AI.
Continue reading “This dystopian device warns you when AI is trying to impersonate actual humans”