Canada Is Investing $2 Billion in a Climate Disaster Mitigation Fund

Meanwhile, in Canada: New budget invests $2 billion in climate disaster mitigation fund

  • Now, the federal government has committed billions of dollars in new funding to make sure that future climate disasters aren’t so completely devastating.
  • Mitigation efforts take a significant amount of money, and last year an audit by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development stated that despite increased levels of funding for disaster recovery, Canada is still not prepared for the intensity of future climate disasters.
  • Read More: Vancouver Considers Abandoning Parts of the Coast Because of Climate Change

    Beyond the climate disaster mitigation fund, Canada has committed to funding machine-learning research, helping out on one of NASA’s Mars missions, and paying for research into stem cell therapies.

  • The 2017 budget has added $150 million from the Public Transit and Green Infrastructure fund, to make a total of $950 million over five years.
  • Another new budget effort to attract more forward-looking companies is the Smart Cities Challenge Fund.

In its new federal budget, Canada invests in machine learning and teaching kids to code, but offers no real plan for how to address workplace automation.
Continue reading “Canada Is Investing $2 Billion in a Climate Disaster Mitigation Fund”

4 challenges Artificial Intelligence must address

4 challenges Artificial Intelligence must address  #AI

  • Huge leaps in AI have accelerated this process dramatically and propagated it to other domains previously imagined to remain indefinitely in the monopoly of human intelligence

    From driving trucks to writing news and performing accounting tasks, AI algorithms are threatening middle class jobs like never before.

  • It’s also true that the AI revolution will create plenty of new data science, machine learning, engineering and IT job positions to develop and maintain the systems and software that will be running those AI algorithms.
  • Teaching new tech skills to people who are losing or might lose their jobs to AI in the future can complement the efforts.
  • Machine Learning, the popular branch of AI that is behind face recognition algorithms, product suggestions, advertising engines, and much more, depends on data to train and hone its algorithms.
  • Unless companies developing and using AI technology regulate their information collection and sharing practices and take necessary steps to anonymize and protect user data, they’ll end up causing harm than good to users.


TNW uses cookies to personalize content and ads to
make our site easier for you to use.
We do also share that information with third parties for
advertising & analytics.

Continue reading “4 challenges Artificial Intelligence must address”

4 challenges Artificial Intelligence must address

4 challenges Artificial Intelligence must address

  • Huge leaps in AI have accelerated this process dramatically and propagated it to other domains previously imagined to remain indefinitely in the monopoly of human intelligence

    From driving trucks to writing news and performing accounting tasks, AI algorithms are threatening middle class jobs like never before.

  • It’s also true that the AI revolution will create plenty of new data science, machine learning, engineering and IT job positions to develop and maintain the systems and software that will be running those AI algorithms.
  • Teaching new tech skills to people who are losing or might lose their jobs to AI in the future can complement the efforts.
  • Machine Learning, the popular branch of AI that is behind face recognition algorithms, product suggestions, advertising engines, and much more, depends on data to train and hone its algorithms.
  • Unless companies developing and using AI technology regulate their information collection and sharing practices and take necessary steps to anonymize and protect user data, they’ll end up causing harm than good to users.


TNW uses cookies to personalize content and ads to
make our site easier for you to use.
We do also share that information with third parties for
advertising & analytics.

Continue reading “4 challenges Artificial Intelligence must address”

Prepare for a world without work

Prepare for a world without work 

 #fintech #robotos @nypost #AI

  • In the short term, we need to find roles in which humans can feel productive.
  • We’ll send you a link to create a new password.
  • We’ve sent an email with instructions to create a new password.
  • Sign Up / Sign In Sign In // Sign Up
  • By clicking above you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .

As we start the year full of good intentions to flourish at work, social scientists are warning that our careers could be over sooner than we expect.

The world is barreling toward what has been dubbed the “post-work economy,” as technology replaces humans at an unprecedented rate.

Driverless cars are set to make millions of truckers and taxi drivers redundant and automated fast food service is poised to shut off a key job sector for young people. As artificial intelligence is increasingly able to carry out complex tasks that used to require humans, large numbers of us are set to find ourselves out of work, with no prospects.

“Many jobs will be destroyed,” futurist Ross Dawson told news.com.au. “We can no longer be sure we’ll have a sufficient amount of the right type of work for people to be employed.”

When should we start panicking?

The experts aren’t sure how soon all this is going to happen, but the shift is taking place faster than predicted. The world of work is now changing more rapidly than during the Industrial Revolution.

Dawson says we can expect more “big hits” in the near future, like the one seen in October when 600 manufacturing workers lost their jobs after Ford closed its Australian factories.

Futurist Chris Riddell told news.com.au that over the next three years, “innovation and disruption will exceed anything we’ve seen to date.”

With high-speed “hyperloop” transport and augmented reality gaining traction, the pace of change is accelerating, but Riddell believes “things are going to get very messy before they get sophisticated.”

How will we survive?

Governments are already in discussions over how we can stay relevant in a world where tech has overtaken the human brain.

The shift toward a huge portion of the population being unemployed will create a string of problems. In terms of finances, we may have to introduce a Universal Basic Income (UBI): a trendy concept being tested in Finland, the Netherlands and Canada, in which every citizen is paid a flat wage, whether they are employed or not.

The idea of a “mincome” (minimum income) is controversial because it is unclear whether it would be more cost-effective than our current welfare system. But if the majority of the population is on the dole, our view on taxing workers to fund the unemployed may have to change.

Will life be one long party?

You may be thinking this all sounds great. Our lives will run smoothly with the help of super-intelligent technology, we won’t be expected to find jobs, and we’ll still earn money.

Technology should remove mundane tasks and allow us to focus on the kind of lifestyles we want.

But Dawson warns the shift could open up a wider chasm between the elite who work and those who do not, since we typically define our worth by what we do.

“This will accelerate the potential for a divide,” he says. “And the polarization of wealth.”

Since we all want to feel valued, we will need to find a way to give people a purpose outside of work, in other aspects of society.

Where will we find purpose?

Some of the greatest minds of the 21st century, Tesla founder Elon Musk and physicist Stephen Hawking, recently wrote an open letter warning of the need to stay abreast of artificial intelligence for fear robots could literally take over our world.

In the short term, we need to find roles in which humans can feel productive. This requires looking at where we still outstrip machines: in expertise, creativity and relationships, for example.

One of Australia’s most potent offerings is world-class eduction, according to Dawson. We have the ability to take a leading role in making sure schools are preparing for the radically different world of the future, and exporting adult education to the world.

As computers become more sophisticated, our abilities at things like mental arithmetic and handwriting are eroding, so it will be vital for us to exercise our motor skills and stay physically and mentally engaged.
Continue reading “Prepare for a world without work”

We Must Remake Society in the Coming Age of AI: Obama

We Must Remake Society in the Coming Age of #AI: Obama on @wired

  • The handy web tool lets you try out fonts like you would a pair of jeans.
  • The President takes a more optimistic view. “
  • We’ve absorbed new technologies, and people find that new jobs are created, they migrate, and our standards of living generally go up,” he says.
  • Subscribe now to get 6 months for $5 – plus a FREE Portable Phone Charger.
  • As we build new forms of AI, he says, we must also develop new economic and social models that can ensure these technologies don’t leave people behind.

In conversation with WIRED, Obama says our economic and social models must change after the rise of the machines.
Continue reading “We Must Remake Society in the Coming Age of AI: Obama”